Posts Tagged ‘China’

Outsourcing nations turn hot for UK freelancers

October 7th, 2014

The number of UK freelancers selling their skills to clients based in countries regarded as outsourcing hubs, like India and China, has leapt by 234 per cent, an e-marketplace says.Outsourcing53

In the last year alone, the number of short term projects for firms based in East Asia, Eastern Europe, India, Pakistan and the Middle East has more than doubled, said PeoplePerHour.

Japan is the biggest end-client, as over the period there has been an eight-fold surge in the stock of UK freelancers registered with the website who have an invoiced a business there.

The last year also saw a four-fold increase in the number of UK freelancers invoicing businesses in India, and about a three-fold increase in the numbers invoicing firms in China.

Pointing to India, PeoplePerHour said the nation’s small businesses and start-ups were “booming,” explaining why such nascent firms were inwardly investing in their own growth.

This move by Indian entrepreneurs to expand their own businesses appears to be eclipsing their traditional focus – “offering support to help western businesses grow,” the site said.

But it explained: “For these businesses to grow, there is a greater need to find people with specialist skills; skills such as business planning, design and copywriting, that are in short supply amongst the local workforce.

“Now with greater financial support/investment behind them, businesses have the resources to look beyond the local labour market, and find global talent that matches their development needs.”

The sub-text is that firms in the East are turning to freelancers and micro businesses in the West because, while such European firms cannot compete on costs, they are skills-rich.

“This burgeoning freelance marketplace, which enables UK professionals with specialist skills to export their talents, could radically change the way businesses operate in the future,” said PeoplePerHour’s founder Xenios Thrasyvoulou.

He added: “Thanks to the evolution of the online marketplace, this pool of highly skilled freelance professionals are now in a position to sell their skills to businesses across the globe.”

Source:http://www.freelanceuk.com/news/4619.shtml

Is outsourcing killing us?

July 17th, 2014

The U.S. is experiencing a different kind of “reshoring.” China, the world’s largest air polluter, is sending us via the jet stream a fair amount of their harmful emissions. And, according to a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, much of it is our own fault.Outsourcing25

Researchers say a large part of the emissions are due to Chinese manufacturers making goods for foreign consumption. For years, American companies have been outsourcing production to China to take advantage of low labor rates. So all the cheap appliances, toys, and electronics we’re hooked on may be coming back to bite us, in an indirect way.

Making many of these products takes a lot of energy. Chinese industry relies on coal as its main source of power, and emissions controls on power plants are often limited or outdated. Further, the general level of manufacturing technology and energy-efficiency standards in particular aren’t as advanced as in the west, so it takes even more energy to make these goods in China.

The study says 36% of the sulfur dioxide, 27% of nitrogen oxides, 22% of CO, and 17% of soot emitted in China are due to production of goods for export. About a fifth of those pollutants were attributed to goods headed to the U.S.

Atmospheric models used by the researchers indicate that this accounted for a quarter of the sulfate pollution over the western U.S. in 2006, and increased surface sulfate concentrations by up to 10% and ozone by 1.5%.

According to the U.S. EPA, scientific evidence links short-term exposure to high levels of sulfur oxides with an array of adverse respiratory effects, including bronchoconstriction and increased asthma symptoms, particularly in children and the elderly. Longer term, it can cause or worsen respiratory diseases such as emphysema and bronchitis, and can aggravate heart disease.

A second NAS study claims computer models show that pollution from Asia, particularly fine aerosols, could be intensifying Pacific storms headed to the U.S. and altering weather patterns over North America.

Simulations showed that aerosols alter the distribution of moisture and heat in the Pacific storm track, a relatively narrow zone where cyclones form and travel and a major driver of weather in the Northern Hemisphere. These tiny particles suspended in the air can change weather patterns because they scatter or absorb solar radiation; and water vapor condenses around aerosols, a process that alters cloud formation and makes them denser and higher. The results, according to the model, are more precipitation, stronger cyclones, and more heat moving from the tropics toward the arctic.

Researchers didn’t predict how this affects U.S. weather, so we have to cross our fingers that it doesn’t exacerbate the Southwest drought or Midwest storms.

What is pretty clear is that air pollution in China isn’t a regional problem. Thanks partly to outsourcing, what we save in cheap goods we’re paying for in lower air quality and, possibly, worse weather.

Source:http://machinedesign.com/blog/outsourcing-killing-us

IBM forks out $100m for China’s next generation of data scientists

July 9th, 2014

IBM announced today its plan to donate US$100 million worth of big data and analytics software to 100 Chinese universities in the hope of helping toOutsourcing12 create the “next generation” of data scientists.

According to IBM, the effort aims to reach up to 40,000 students per year to gain expertise in big data and analytics — a skill that the company says is increasingly in demand in China.

The plan follows a memorandum of understanding that IBM signed with the Chinese Ministry of Education in the first quarter of this year, with a focus on addressing the big data and analytics “skills opportunity” in the country.

“IBM is privileged to extend its collaboration with the Ministry of Education and universities in China,” said D.C. Chien, chairman and CEO of IBM’s Greater China Group. “Together we will be able to accelerate the nurturing of skills in big data and analytics and help prepare future business leaders to apply [big data and analytics] technologies to tackle complex societal issues, from health care to transportation and public services.”

Under the new initiative, IBM will set up big data and analytics technology centres, and provide technical training to professors and faculty, in areas ranging from information management, data mining, social media analytics, and risk management.

Big Blue has already been in collaboration with seven universities, including the Beijing Institute of Technology, Fudan University, Guizhou University, and Huazhong University of Science and Technology, which are among the pilot schools that will rollout new programs in their education system in the coming academic year.

The company plans to bring 40 new universities on board to this program by the end of this year. In fact, according to IBM, the application guidelines will be issued to all qualified academic institutions later this month, with the program rolled out to all 100 universities in mid-2015.

The agreement comes at a time when the United States’ use of big data and analytics for surveillance purposes has the Chinese government on edge — following the publication of documents leaked by whistleblower Edward Snowden last year.

Over the past few months, Beijing has reportedly pulled Microsoft’s Windows 8 from all new government agency computers, and called for private industry to replace US-made IT hardware and software with domestic alternatives. Reports last month suggested that the government was even urging the country’s banks to remove high-end IBM servers from their operations.

Despite this, IBM has brokered not only its university big data donation deal — dubbed IBM U-100 — with the Chinese authorities; it has also struck an agreement with kaikeba.com, a prominent subsidiary brand of Chinese education solution provider, Uniquedu Corporation.

The deal with kaikeba.com will see IBM set up an “IBM zone of big data and analytics”, and according to IBM, the agreement will deliver online courses to students in order to help prepare the next-generation workforce with the skills and expertise needed to embrace big data as the “next frontier for innovation for the coming decades”.

“Big data is big business, but its rapid growth has outpaced colleges’ and universities’ ability to develop and implement new curriculums,” said Li Shu Chong, president of China’s largest research, consulting, and IT outsourcing service company, CCID Consulting. “IBM’s extensive initiative is poised to help develop new talent in China that will be needed to realize the full potential of big data.”

According to CCID, the big data technology and services market in China will continue to grow from US$2.3 billion in 2014 to US$8.7 billion in 2016.

Source:http://www.zdnet.com/ibm-forks-out-100m-for-chinas-next-generation-of-data-scientists-7000031369/

China no threat to Indian IT: Infy

June 17th, 2014

China’s rapidly growing IT industry is not a threat to Indian software services firms yet despite a major policy push towards outsourcing. “Our USD 100 billion software industry is under no threat from China,” Rangarajan Vellamore, CEO of Infosys, China told PTI.  This is because Chinese firms are not yet investing big in the US where Indian software firms are well entrenched.Outsourcing6

Chinese firms haven’t yet made an impact in the global IT services market as the industry reaches saturation point amid severe competition among global and Indian firms.

Global IT spending is expected to rise by 3.2 per cent to touch USD 3.8 trillion in 2014, according to technology research firm Gartner Inc.

Rangarajan, who has been working in China for the past seven years, said Chinese IT companies are not investing in the US as they are unable to understand the nuances of the market penetration and have given up their efforts making it secure for the Indian firms at least as of now.  The exchange rate has also made the difference, he said.

Source:http://freepressjournal.in/china-no-threat-to-indian-it-infy/

China’s service outsourcing industry booms

June 17th, 2014

Service outsourcing has become a major growth industry in China, with its value reaching 1.7 trillion yuan (about 272 billion U.S. dollars) in 2013, said a report released on Sunday.Outsourcing2

The figure represented about 2.97 percent of the country’s gross domestic product last year and contributed 0.8 percent of China’s economic growth, said the “2014 Development Report of China’s Outsourcing Brand Development.”

It was released by the Chinese Academy of International Trade and Economic Cooperation at the Global Service Trade and Outsourcing Summit, which runs from Saturday to Monday in Qingdao of east China’s Shandong Province.

The industry provides the country with direct and indirect employment of 5.36 million and 17.8 million respectively, said the report.
Last year, it created 1.06 million new jobs, accounting for 8.1 percent of all new jobs in urban China.

The report said that information technology outsourcing dominates China’s service outsourcing industry, which also saw rapid growth in knowledge process outsourcing.
China has off-shore outsourcing businesses in about 200 countries and regions, and has explored emerging markets in the Asian-Pacific region and its domestic market.

The country will exploit its advantages in infrastructure, human resources, market scale and capacity for innovation to increase its global share of the service outsourcing market, the report forecast.

Source:http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/business/n/2014/0616/c90778-8741757.html

SPi Global Bachieve International to Expand into China

May 15th, 2014

BPO firm SPi Global is to expand into China, having acquired Bachieve International Inc. for an undisclosed price. With about 260 employees, Bachieve International Inc. offers BPO, IT outsourcing, management consulting services and call center solutions in western China.outsourcing42

The acquisition, said SPi Global President and CEO Maulik Parekh, will strengthen the company’s operations in India and the Philippines. Three years ago, Parekh had talked of opening an office in Latin America to cater to Spanish-speaking customers mostly in the United States. But the company has not set up a delivery center in Latin America yet. In the same year, he also spoke of plans to expand to China.

“China is a welcome addition to our global footprint. Having the option of delivering services from China will benefit our existing and future clients with the vast resources and talents available in the region,” Parekh said.

Based in Makati City, Philippines, SPi Global looks set to fully integrate Bachieve International and create a new entity in China, specifically to cash in on the growing demand for content services in Western China’s Xi’An city.

According to a July 2012 report by the Economist Intelligence Unit, Xi’An is one of the 13 emerging megacities and a growing economic hub in interior China. Over 2,560 enterprises from at least fifty-eight countries have established a presence in Xian, including nineteen Fortune 500 enterprises. These include ABB Group, Mitsubishi,Toshiba, Fujitsu, Coca-Cola, and Boeing.

A subsidiary of Asia Outsourcing Gamma, SPi Gglobal has over 19,000 employees and delivers a wide range of voice and non-voice BPO solutions. Gamma is 80%-owned by CVC Capital Partners, a private equity and investment advisory firm, and 20% by the Philippine Long Distance Telephone Company, a major telecom carrier in the Philippines.

Source:http://www.nearshoreamericas.com/spi-global-bachieve-international-expand-china/

Pensioners withdraw lawsuit against IBM over China sales

May 6th, 2014

A pension and relief fund that sued IBM for failing to warn investors of loss of business in China because of its alleged involvement with spying by the U.S. National Security Agency has voluntarily withdrawn the lawsuit in a New York court.outsourcing17

The Louisiana Sheriffs’ Pension and Relief Fund has decided to voluntarily dismiss the action after additional investigation into the matters alleged, which included investigations in the U.S. and China and discussions with the defense counsel, John C. Browne, lawyer for the fund, wrote to the court in a letter disclosed Monday.

“We said the complaint proceeded to make numerous specious and false accusations, and IBM called upon the law firm that filed this action to do the right thing and dismiss it. We are pleased that they have done the right thing,” IBM spokesman Doug Shelton wrote in an emailed statement.

In a December lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, Louisiana Sheriffs’ Pension and Relief Fund claimed that IBM failed to inform investors that sales in China would slow after disclosures that IBM was allegedly cooperating with a NSA spying program.

Robert C. Weber, IBM’s senior vice president and general counsel, said at the time the suit was “pushing a wild conspiracy theory,” and called on the law firm filing the suit to do the right thing and withdraw the action as the complaint made numerous “specious and false accusations.” IBM had attributed a drop in hardware sales in the third quarter partly to delayed procurement by Chinese government agencies while the local government framed a new economic policy.

IBM knew that the Chinese government would prohibit purchases of its products by businesses and government agencies after reports of its alleged involvement in a NSA spying program called Prism, according to the complaint by the pension fund, which cited a report in The Guardian newspaper about the NSA program. The retaliation would particularly affect the sales of IBM’s Systems and Technology Group. IBM actively concealed the immediate impact the revelation of Prism had on the company’s business in China, the complaint said.

In March, Weber wrote in a letter to customers that the company has not provided client data to the NSA or any other government agency under Prism or under any surveillance program involving the bulk collection of content or metadata.( Weber also reassured customers that IBM has not provided client data stored outside the U.S. to the U.S. government under a national security order, such as an order under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act or a National Security Letter.

Other U.S. tech companies have also distanced themselves from NSA surveillance, particularly the Prism program, which raised concerns among customers worldwide about the safety of their data from U.S. government spying.

Source:http://www.computerworld.co.nz/article/544413/pensioners_withdraw_lawsuit_against_ibm_over_china_sales/?fp=16&fpid=1

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