Posts Tagged ‘IBM’

Managed Private Cloud on the Rise as Data Center Outsourcing Service

August 28th, 2015

Managed virtual private cloud services are gaining popularity as part of data center outsourcing contracts enterprises make with the likes of IBM, HP, or Dell.Outsourcing31

That’s according to the market research firm Gartner, which published its annual Magic Quadrant report on the North American data center outsourcing market published late last month.

Gartner puts managed private cloud in the category of “Infrastructure Utility Services,” or services that companies pay for based on resource usage or number of users served. “Increasingly, IUS are based on managed virtual private cloud services,” the report read.

Industrialized infrastructure services are what is going to drive future growth in the data center services market in general, according to the analysts. That growth will come at the expense of growth and margins for traditional services, which Gartner expects to face further pressure.

This category of services includes both Infrastructure-as-a-Service and Platform-as-a-Service.

IBM and HP remained top data center outsourcing providers on the latest Magic Quadrant for North America, ahead of everyone else in terms of both vision and execution. Other providers Gartner named leaders were Dell, HCL Technologies, and CSC.

Here’s Gartner’s 2015 Magic Quadrant for Data Center Outsourcing in North America:

Gartner Data Center Outsourcing MQ NAM 2015

While it named HP one of the leaders in the category, Gartner estimated that its data center outsourcing and infrastructure utility services revenue in 2014 was down about 5 percent from the prior year.

HP’s key strengths in the outsourcing market are its infrastructure scale – close to 80,000 physical servers across about 30 data centers – its ability to provide just about every kind of data center outsourcing service imaginable, and strong management and budget oversight in service engagements.

While a leader in every other respect, however, HP’s cloud services haven’t done as well as the company may have hoped, according to Gartner. HP says its managed cloud server offering called Helion has seen double-digit growth, but the penetration of its virtual private cloud, utility, or managed private cloud offerings remains below 15 percent, according to the analysts.

HP’s rival IBM is the largest player in the market for both cloud and traditional enterprise data centers. Gartner estimates that Big Blue makes about $3 billion in annual sales on its data center outsourcing services.

Its main strengths are focusing on solving specific business issues for clients rather than simply providing standard technology and support services, breadth and depth of resources, and willingness to switch to new service models.

One of Gartner’s cautions about IBM was the potential for impact on existing interfaces and processes of the company’s recent restructuring, which included melding of its former Strategic Outsourcing and Integrated Technology Services. The new unit, called Infrastructure Services, combines everything from networking to mobility.

IBM’s Global Technology Services segment, which includes Infrastructure Services, lost more than $1 billion in revenue in 2014, according to Gartner’s estimates. The analysts attributed this loss to new and emerging providers in the market who are agile and extremely competitive.

Gartner said IBM needs to review its strategy and be more open to enabling its clients to use competitors’ cloud services, such as AWS and Azure, as opposed to driving them squarely to its own SoftLayer cloud.

Source:http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2015/08/27/managed-private-cloud-on-the-rise-as-data-center-outsourcing-service/

Indian Firms Fight Fiercely with Global Peers Over Large Outsourcing Deals

May 26th, 2015

Indian outsourcing firms such as Cognizant and Wipro captured nearly a quarter of the top 100 outsourcing deals in 2014, according to a study by research firm IDC.Outsourcing
Despite being small in size compared to their American peers, Indian BPO providers are proving strong competitors for large outsourcing deals. To strength their hand they are putting forward new offerings such as cloud and hosting services.

Analysts say that investing in more transformative capabilities in areas such as analytics, social media, and mobility, and enhancing strategic local capabilities and resources, have enabled them to compete successfully with well-established players.

Leveraging the offshore business model has also contributed greatly to their success, according to David Tapper, IDC’s Vice President, Outsourcing and Offshore Services.

According to IDC’s data, Indian outsourcing companies represented more than 50% of the total contract value of the top 100 outsourcing deals in 2014. In 2013, by comparison, they represented 43% of the total contract value.

Globally, the top five vendors – who include the likes of IBM and CGI – have continued to snap up nearly 50% of high-valued outsourcing deals. With US$13.8 billion worth of deals, IBM tops the list. CGI is ranked second, though the value of the contracts ($2.8 billion) it won is considerably lower.

Indian firms Cognizant and Wipro are quickly catching up with CGI, having won contracts worth $2.7 billion and $2.3 billion respectively.

The research firm says the number of mega deals is currently shrinking, as are the number of government contracts. Furthermore, very few providers are competing for mega deals, partly due to a belief that large deals can be very complicated to implement.

Source:http://www.nearshoreamericas.com/report-indian-firms-fight-fiercely-large-outsourcing-deals-global-peers/

Indian IT firms like TCS, Infosys to gain from HP’s enterprise services cost cuts, say analysts

May 25th, 2015

Hewlett-Packard’s decision to cut $2 billion (about Rs 12,700 crore) in costs in its enterprise services business could open up opportunities for Indian technology firms such as Tata Consultancy Services and InfosysBSE -0.08 %, said analysts tracking the development. Outsourcing48

Infrastructure contracts such as HP’s $400-million data centre outsourcing deal with oil company BP in 2010 and its $700-million deal with German energy provider E.ON could be taken over by Indian firms when renewed, they said. HP’s troubled enterprise services businesses provides technology consulting, outsourcing and support services and competes with companies such as TCS, Infosys, Wipro, IBM and Accenture.

“In the infrastructure space, certainly they are being challenged by cheaper Indian providers,”said an Indian IT industry consultant, declining to be identified. “And the constant round of cost-cutting is a distraction and makes them less competitive.”

The 75-year-old company faces increasing pressure in India where its pricing is much higher than that of traditional outsourcing firms, and some shedding of contracts will happen with the split, giving Indian IT companies an opportunity to take over HP’s market share, said a second industry expert who also did not want to be named.

“HP has been in constant restructuring for a while; the whole company has been in flux,”said Tom Reuner, managing director at HfS Research. “It’s caught between two big rocks –the secular trend of asset light, more cloud-based IT and its own internal troubles.”

The planned cuts in the enterprises services division can come from staff reductions, moving more work offshore, delaying or eliminating investments, and writing down assets that are being deprecated, said Peter Bendor-Samuel, chief executive at consulting firm Everest Group.

Source:http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/tech/ites/indian-it-firms-like-tcs-infosys-to-gain-from-hps-enterprise-services-cost-cuts-say-analysts/articleshow/47409478.cms

IBM, UBG to accelerate hybrid cloud adoption in Kuwait

May 22nd, 2015

United Business group (UBG), a leader in IT infrastructure management, technical support services, IT consultancy and technology resource outsourcing in Kuwait, has partnered with IBM Cloud to transform its business into a managed service provider.Outsourcing47

IBM and UBG will offer a flexible hybrid cloud platform based on OpenStack to deliver customised cloud services to customers in Kuwait.

The businesses will be able to choose to have their data located in country and given the option to have the data reside either on premise or off premise.

The market shift toward cloud-enabled business models is accelerating and buying behaviour is largely focused in ‘as-a-service’ options, which is driving a huge demand for in-country managed services and the hybrid cloud, said a statement.

To address this market change, UBG employed IBM Cloud to offer customers in Kuwait the option for subscription model cloud-based offerings to save costs and increase operational agility, choice, and flexibility, it said.

The new model will also grant customers the transparency to use all data and apps across multiple platforms, the control and governance to manage heavy workloads, and a multi-layered approach to ensure security across every interaction point.

UBG will also offer to its clients in Kuwait Bluemix, IBM’s Digital Innovation Platform, to speed up app development, cutting deployment time from months to minutes.

The new model also allows businesses to select from a range of hardware configuration options based on open standards and deploy services from IBM’s SoftLayer global data centres based on the needs of the workload.

The businesses will be able to focus more on building functional applications and services and less on the backend processes, such as the infrastructure and cloud management systems.

Marawan Megawer, vice president – Global Business Partners, IBM Middle East and Africa, said: ”By offering our customers access to a hybrid cloud platform based on open standards, we will be able to help break down the barriers between clouds and on premise IT systems, providing clients with control, visibility and security as they use both public and private clouds.

“Data location across an ever growing number of clouds is an increasing concern for customers, and we are unveiling new developer services to make this easier to manage.”

IBM recently opened its first office in Kuwait to strengthen its ability to provide solutions and services to a rapidly expanding customer and partner base in the country.

The office is part of a broad program of investment that IBM is making across the Middle East. The new office will act as a sales and customer service hub for IBM’s comprehensive line of offerings in the region.

Muraleedharan Nanoo, managing director, UBG, said: “We are leveraging IBM Cloud, analytics, mobile and security offerings in order to create high-value, competitively differentiated services. Our goal is to improve development productivity and reliability to better serve our customers.”

Source:http://tradearabia.com/news/IT_282438.html

Indian outsourcing is booming in the Nordic countries

April 13th, 2015

Indian IT service providers are securing more and more high-profile outsourcing deals in the Nordics, involving the likes of Nokia, DNB and ABB. And with companies such as HCL Technologies and Wipro announcing further investments in the region, their presence is expected to grow.Outsourcing23

Gartner research analyst Mika Rajamäki said: “Based on 2013 figures, Indian IT suppliers have been growing faster in the Nordic market than the traditional service providers. If the annual growth of the traditional suppliers has been 2-3%, Indian companies have been growing by almost 20% a year.”

Indian IT companies have not yet hit the Nordics’ top 10 IT suppliers list, but this is likely to change. Because Indian service providers focus mainly on the biggest fish in the manufacturing, finance and telecoms industries, one major deal can boost their market share significantly.

“Sweden has the largest market, but Indian companies seem to have the highest market share in Finland, around 4%,” said Rajamäki. “In Denmark, Sweden and Norway, their market share is around 1%, but these figures are from 2013 and there were some major deals last year, so the figures have definitely grown. Average market share for Indian companies in the Nordics is probably around 4-5%, closer to 5%, and in Finland it will grow to 6-7% this year.”

Some Indian IT suppliers have been operating in the Nordics since the 1990s, but the real challenge has begun over the past five years. Their aim is to shake up a static market dominated by local and multinational suppliers such as Tieto, Evry, KMD, IBM and Accenture.

Increasing investments in the region include HCL’s seven-year deal with Norway’s DNB bank, worth $400m. While most services are still offshore, companies such as Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), HCL Technologies, Wipro, Infosys and Tech Mahindra have several offices in Nordic countries and a growing number of local delivery centres.

Johan Hallberg, research manager at IDC Nordic, said: “In the past, Indian IT suppliers were doing lower-level outsourcing and were often invited as subcontractors by medium-size Nordic players. But they have learnt that they can’t sell on price alone. They understand that they need more than a sales force in the Nordics and have started to market themselves in a different way.”

The Nordic appeal
But why the Nordics? Hallberg says the Nordic IT services market has been growing more quickly than in continental Europe, especially in Sweden, which has not been hit as hard by the economic crisis as many other European countries. The Nordics also have a relatively mature market and a large public sector with a major IT budget, he adds.

According to IDC figures, the IT services market in the Nordics was worth $24.4bn in 2014. Outsourcing is worth $12.6bn of that and it remains the main area where Indian suppliers operate.

While it is an attractive market, a key fact about the Nordics is that they still value local presence. A 2013 Ernst and Young study found that most outsourced services remained ‘onshore’ (in the same location or country). This is especially true of Sweden, where 87% of outsourced services were located onshore. Denmark was at the other end of the spectrum with 59% of services onshore, while Finland (74%) and Norway (80%) sat in the middle.

“The Indian suppliers have understood that they need to have local sales forces, local consultants and local datacentres,” said Hallberg. “It has become even more important for Nordic services companies to show their understanding of local business culture, laws and rules. Nordic suppliers have also started to specialise to meet Indian competition.”

The importance of a local presence is echoed by TCS, the biggest Indian IT supplier in the Nordics. Amit Bajaj, the company’s head of North Europe, says TCS has more than doubled the size of its operation in the Nordics since 2010 and has increased local hiring.

“We see the Nordic countries as a very interesting market,” said Bajaj. “This region hosts a number of very innovative and internationally competitive firms – just the kind that are a good match for us.”

Shaking up customer service
Gone are the days when the success of Indian IT suppliers could be measured only in cost savings. In recent years, Indian service providers have shown up well in customer satisfaction surveys. In Whitelane Research’s 2014 Nordic IT Outsourcing Study, TCS led the pack with 83% for contract satisfaction, with Infosys close behind at 79%, both well above the average of 71%. Three out of the top 10 companies in the survey were Indian.

IDC Nordic’s Hallberg added: “Many companies in the Nordics are in their third generation of outsourcing and are often mature in their requests. This has led to services companies needing to be even better in their customer understanding and to be closer to customers.

“The local revenue of some Indian suppliers has grown by more than 30% year-on-year. They are usually in the final selection phase in larger deals, which was not the case just a couple of years ago.”

Gartner’s Rajamäki pointed out that Indian companies can be very agile in their operations and act like small companies.

“Indians are slightly more daring in taking risks [than traditional players] and share the risk of their customers,” he said. “They are also efficient in the transition phase. Most deals today are taken over from competitors, and completely new deals are a rarity. What Indian suppliers do very well is to rapidly take over a customer and invest in the relationship.”

The deals Indian companies are winning are not just focused on one area, but range from help desks and IT infrastructure to application development and modernisation of legacy systems.

Breaking down barriers
Hallberg and Rajamäki both believe competition in the Nordic market can only grow. Indian IT suppliers are starting to gain a foothold in other IT services, such as project services. They are also starting to challenge traditional players for public sector deals as language barriers can be overcome by hiring locally, forming local partnerships or even acquisitions.

“Traditional Nordic and multinational players will increase offshoring where it is viable, such as cloud services, while Indian suppliers have come to the Nordics to stay and will continue to build their presence here,” says Rajamäki.

At the same time, the IT services market is undergoing a wider transformation. Although Bajaj cannot comment on TCS’s future plans in the Nordics, he highlights the internet of things, cloud services, digitisation and BYOD trends as drivers of change in the industry.

“The market is in a state of dramatic and constant change,” says Bajaj. “It has been predicted that in 10 years’ time, 40% of the current Fortune 500 companies will no longer exist.

“In this changing environment, organisations are fighting to get a lead on the digital re-imagining of their business, to simplify their processes and systems and to secure appropriate governance in terms of security, risk management and compliance. As Gartner pointed out, global IT spend will continue to grow at over 3% for this year.”

The changing Nordic market presents both an opportunity and a challenge for services providers, but one thing is certain: competition is increasing, and so are the rewards.

Source:http://www.computerweekly.com/news/4500244037/Indian-outsourcing-is-booming-in-the-Nordic-countries

Why Companies Opt to Insource for IT Innovation

March 20th, 2015

Companies are increasingly taking a multisourcing approach to IT outsourcing, signing shorter, smaller deals with a mix of providers. At the same time, some are pulling certain pieces of the IT portfolio back in-house.Outsourcing11

“As you get into the second and third generation renewals, each renewal sees a bit more work being sliced off and taken back in-house,” says Mike Slavin, Managing Director of outsourcing consultancy Alsbridge. “And those functions being repatriated are often related to innovation.”
Outsourcing customers seek innovation

Lack of innovation remains one of the top complaints about outsourcing. Outsourcing customers say that providers fail to bring any new ideas to the table. Providers protest that clients don’t know what they mean by innovation and aren’t willing to pay for it. And traditional outsourcing bidding and contractual processes aren’t designed to drive innovation–in fact they thwart it.

“Because of competitive pressures, providers have to do internal cost take-outs to win deals. That squeezes margins and profit expectations, and means that most of the upside for the service providers is during the latter portion of the deal,” says Slavin. “This gives account management teams little room to provide creative ideas and fund innovative pilots and projects.”

In addition, few outsourcing agreements call for a standing innovation committee or an innovation fund, for example.

Traditional IT service providers — like IBM and HP — built their businesses on the transfer of both human capital and physical assets to the supplier, creating an environment that discouraged innovation, says Slavin. Indian vendors developed business models on a foundation of labor arbitrage and price competition, which also obstructed innovation.

Little has changed about either approach in the last decade. “Rather than hiring and training a new style and culture of technical talent to support what IT looks like in 2015, clients often see 20- and 30-year veterans who have survived the many layoffs and workforce reductions being rebranded as cloud or mobility experts,” says Slavin. “But the reality is that these veterans have little grounding in those technologies.”

Innovating for customers vs. supporting in-house customer innovation
Traditional players with significant infrastructure assets are digging in, arguing that their years of experience running those systems makes them best suited to innovate on behalf of their customers, Slavin says. In addition, they employ various “handcuff” strategies that make the process of exiting agreements and moving operations back in-house difficult for a customer, according to Slavin.

Some Indian firms, however, are encouraging their clients to take some services back in-house, even offering their staffing resources to support in the transition to and management of the new model, says Slavin. “These providers do not have the large asset base in fixed assets such as data centers and are happy to provide services to a client in their own data center or perhaps a [co-located center].  Several pitch this strategy as something that mitigates the traditional sourcing risks, allowing the clients to potentially move services more readily if they are not happy.”

Meanwhile, consultancies like Accenture and Deloitte are pitching themselves as sources of IT innovation to companies. “These players have generally stayed out of the highly price-competitive and sometimes asset-heavy infrastructure marketplace,” Slavin says. “These consulting firms have a business model built on human capital, one that focuses on skills and experience and is better-suited to deliver technology relevance and alignment with the client’s business. They’re also committed to ongoing training and are willing to carry out needed trimming of non-performers. Finally, they’re able to avoid the episodic large mass workforce reductions that plague the large outsourcing firms.”

It’s too early to say which approach will win out long term.

“The most challenged players will continue to be firms like IBM, HP and CSC,” says Slavin. While they are trying to reorganize to provide vertical solutions like mobility, cloud and analytics, they remain desperate to hold and serve their big clients to avoid revenue run-off.

“HP and IBM have great hardware, and clients expect innovative solutions that take advantage of that great hardware,” Slavin says. “Unfortunately, the outsourcing organizations seem to be lagging at enabling and accessing the emerging technologies needed to drive innovation.”

Indian providers will continue to grow their market share, says Slavin. “The challenge for this group is to grow into more profitable markets and expand footprints in clients fast enough to stay ahead of aggressive pricing, which is built into their deals as an investment to win.”

In the short-term, IT outsourcing customers will either be looking to providers who can provide real business outcomes or taking their innovation-related business back in-house to run themselves.

“Innovation is always in the eye of beholder. It’s hard to argue with something that aligns with the client’s business and moves that business forward,” Slavin says. “So the winners will be those who can provide applications and the supporting infrastructure and link them together as a product, service, or offering that focuses on and is tied to the business.”

Source:http://www.channelworld.in/feature/why-companies-opt-to-insource-for-it-innovation

IBM leads infrastructure outsourcing segment: Forrester

February 27th, 2015

IBM is the leading supplier in the global infrastructure outsourcing segment, said Forrester Research in a new research note.Outsourcing6

IBM scored the highest or among the highest among 13 suppliers across three high-level evaluation criteria: Strategy, Current Offering and Market Presence.

Forrester recognized IBM’s vision for the future of infrastructure services, noting that cloud services has become a major element of IBM’s infrastructure management strategy, said the report called The Forrester Wave: Global Infrastructure Outsourcing, Q1 2015.

According to Forrester, the size of the global infrastructure outsourcing market is $187.5 billion, with North America comprising nearly 58 percent of this total.

Infrastructure outsourcing services are critically important as enterprises prepare their infrastructure for the digital age. Outsourcing providers are emphasizing qualities that include predictability through analytics, self-healing with autonomic computing and automation, and self-service with adaptation to cloud models and use of service stores.

IBM views the current infrastructure management services market as the age of outcomes, IP, and automation. IBM is pursuing several initiatives, including automation with IBM Workload Automation and integration across systems of record and systems of engagement. Since its acquisition of SoftLayer Technologies in 2013, cloud services have become a major element of its infrastructure management strategy.

The report says IBM has a very strong vision for the future of infrastructure services and a very well-balanced global delivery model.

Recently, IBM announced IT infrastructure services deals with enterprise clients including WPP, ABN Amro, Lufthansa and WOOX Innovations.

Source:http://www.infotechlead.com/it/ibm-leads-infrastructure-outsourcing-segment-forrester-28388

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